New recipes

Is This the Next Hit Burger From Wendy’s?

Is This the Next Hit Burger From Wendy’s?


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Wendy’s brings back its Bacon Mozzarella Burger for a limited time

The Bacon Mozzarella Burger features a garlic parmesan cheese spread, sliced red onions, a spring mix, and, of course, bacon, mozzarella, and a beef patty.

Wendy’s takes its fans by surprise once again by bringing back its previously unannounced, limited-edition Bacon Mozzarella Burger, back for a limited time.

Kurt Kane, Wendy's chief concept and marketing officer, said, “The Bacon Mozzarella is a cheeseburger lover's dream. From the first bite, this combination of fresh beef and oven-cooked bacon paired with melty mozzarella and a garlic parmesan cheese spread creates a deliciously unforgettable burger.”

The burger features the chain’s classic thick-cut Applewood-smoked bacon and fresh, never frozen North American beef, adding mozzarella cheese, a garlic parmesan cheese spread, sliced red onions, spring mix, and a toasted garlic brioche bun to elevate a classic bacon cheeseburger.

The burger is available at participating Wendy’s locations for $4.69, according to a release.

Think you know Wendy’s? Here’s 10 things we bet you didn’t know about the chain.


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Wendy's pulls burgers off the menu at some locations due to meat shortage

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not seving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Photograph: Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

Last modified on Wed 1 Jul 2020 17.31 BST

As many as one in five restaurants in the giant Wendy’s fast-food chain across the US has had to stop serving hamburgers or other beef-based menu items, in the latest sign of an escalating threat of a national meat shortage caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wendy’s customers in various US locations have reported being unable to purchase burgers at restaurants belonging to one of the world’s largest hamburger chains. The fast-food company has confirmed it is experiencing problems with beef suppliers and that “some of our menu items may be temporarily limited at some restaurants in this current environment”.

About 1,000 Wendy’s restaurants, a fifth of the company’s American outlets, are not serving burgers and other beef dishes, according to financial analyst firm Stephens. Some states are particularly affected, with restaurants in Ohio, Michigan and New York running extremely low on fresh meat, while other states such as Arizona and Nevada aren’t as badly hit.

Wendy’s meatless woes are a symptom of a broader slowdown in America’s meat production as thousands of workers in processing plants fall sick from Covid-19 and facilities shutter due to fears of further spread of the virus.

Donald Trump attempted to rectify the situation by signing an executive order on 28 April that aims to keep meat-processing plants in operation. But the order is not expected to resolve the slowdown as it won’t protect workers from a highly contagious disease spreading in the crowded environs of a processing facility.

Dozens of workers have already died from Covid-19, according to unions, with many employees expressing fear that they are on the frontline of a dangerous coronavirus hotspot.

Tyson Foods, one of America’s largest meat producers, said its output of pork is down by 50% despite measures it claims it has taken to physically distance workers and ensure the supply of meat. The company recently took out a full-page advert in the New York Times to warn that the “food supply chain is breaking” due to a highly unusual situation where both the production and distribution of meat has been crippled by a public health emergency.

Over the past month, Tyson has closed three major plants in Iowa and one in Indiana after huge numbers of employees fell sick from Covid-19. Its beef-processing operations in Washington state and Nebraska have also shut down after a spate of infections.

A weekly report from the US Department of Agriculture on 27 April illustrated the national decline in meat output, with beef production down 25% on the same period last year, while pork production slumped 15%. This shortfall will lead to price increases in some restaurants and stores and shortages in others, analysts said.

“You’re going to see empty shelves,” Steve Meyer, an economist for agricultural risk management firm Kerns and Associates, told the Washington Post. “Not all the time, and it won’t last forever.”


Watch the video: Wendys - Soviet Fashion Show 1985, USA (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Stiabhan

    I confirm. This was and with me. We will discuss this question.

  2. Mona

    I am sorry, that I interrupt you.

  3. Stearc

    It is just a wonderful message

  4. Ammitai

    Did you quickly come up with such a matchless phrase?

  5. Verge

    I regret, that I can not participate in discussion now. I do not own the necessary information. But with pleasure I will watch this theme.



Write a message